How to Carry

There are tons of ways to wrap. Dozens of carries and even more ways to tie them off. We would love to help you make sure you're wrapping in a safe way. After all, it is your little one we're talking about!

We believe the best way to get on your wrapping-feet is to have a little réal help. Contact a local babywearing consultant and have them show you how to carry your baby in the best and safest way possible.

How to carry Baby sling or Baby wrap

Safety:

On the internet there are a lot of helpful instructions, YouTube channels and pictures that can help you learn how to wrap. We however do not recommend to only go by their advice. We believe the best way to get on your wrapping-feet is to have a little réal help. Contact a local babywearing consultant and have them show you how to carry your baby in the best and safest way possible. You would be surprised by the amount of tricks the Internet didn't reveal!

Once you get going, wrapping will become pretty easy pretty soon. To make sure all is and will be safe, please keep the following steps in mind:

Tight
Slings and carriers should be tight enough to hug your baby close to you as this will be most comfortable for you both. If a sling is too loose they can slump which can partially close the airway. (You can test this by placing a hand on your baby’s back and pressing gently - they should not uncurl or move closer to you.)

In view at all times
You should always be able to see your baby’s face by simply glancing down. The fabric of a sling or carrier should not close around them so you have to open it to check on them. We strongly recommend you not to use the cradle carry position.

Close enough to kiss
Your baby’s head should be as close to your chin as is comfortable. By tipping your head forward you should be able to kiss your baby on the head or forehead.

Keep chin off the chest 
A baby should never be curled so their chin is forced onto their chest as this can restrict their breathing. Ensure there is always a space of at least a finger width under your baby’s chin. Herefor we recommend you not to use the cradle position

Supported back
A baby should be held comfortably close to the wearer so their back is supported in its natural position with the baby’s legs in a frog or ‘M’ position with their bottom lower than their knees and their tummy and chest are against you.

Warning: Failure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions can result in death or serious injury.